Surf — Innovation

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Recycling Sea Waste To Surf Fins

Recycling Sea Waste To Surf Fins As an ocean dweller, there’s a good chance you have at some point paddled across floating garbage. With the magnitude of pollution continuing to increase there are already estimations that there is 5,254,000,000,000 pieces of plastic debris polluting our oceans globally. Among the most heavily affected regions are the popular surf destinations around South East Asia, particularly the Indonesian archipelago. Worldclass waves in the Bali and Java islands of Indonesia have, in recent years, become highly polluted from the influx of tourists and the affects of the tourism industry.  Recognising the need for change, the...

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Algae Surfboards - A New Addition To Your Quiver

Erik Jepsen/ UC San Diego Publications Biology students created the algae surfboards by replacing the foam core commonly crafted of petroleum oil with algae oil Algae Surfboards are a new addition to the long list of innovations coming into the surfing industry. The surf industry is drawing inspiration from an underrated aquatic organism. In celebration of 2015 Earth Day, Avila Surfboards, and environmentalist Rob Machado, unveiled the world’s first sustainable algae based surfboard.   Most people don’t realise that petroleum is algae oil hellip; always been muses for surfing technologies. From the dorsal fin of a dolphin inspiring the surfboard fin,...

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History Of Surfing Innovation Part 5: The Shortboard Revolution

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Part 5: The Shortboard Revolution Terry Fitzgerald's quiver of psychadelic sticks California Heritage Museum The Shortboard revolution was a critical period in the history of surfing innovation. In three years, from 1967 to 1970, the average 12-kilogram board dropped to 6; 5-kilogram boards. This short timeframe was crucial to where surfing is today and it has been credited to two forward thinking innovators, American George Greenough and Aussie Bob McTavish. In 1965, when the Santa Barbara kneeboarder Greenough visited the shaper McTavish on the North Coast of NSW, McTavish was impressed by Greenough’sflexible, lightweight kneeboards ability to stay tucked into the lip of...

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History of Surfing Innovation: Part 3: Wood to Fibreglass

History of Surfing Innovation: Part 3: Wood to Fibreglass

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The 1930’s and 40’s were a ground breaking period in the history of surfing innovation. People were getting in the water more thanks to Blake’s lightweight finned boards. Inspired byBlake’s innovative designs, a group of Hawaiian surfers, Fran Heath, Wally Froseith and John Kelly experimented with shaping and tail sizes. By shaving off parts of the tail and rails, a steep contoured Roll/Vee tail was crafted, allowing more control and maneuverability. This board the ‘Hot Curl’ finally allowed surfer to ride in the ‘hot curl’, or curling peak of the wave. From 1932, redwood was largely partnered with the South American balsa wood. A super lightweight alternative to redwood; balsa boards were coated in varnish to waterproof. The centre of the boards was balsa and the rails, redwood to ensure strength and durability. And then it happened. World War II finished and...

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The History Of Surfing Innovation Part 6: 1980’s -90’s

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The 1980's-90's were an interesting time in the history of surfing innovation, the era marked the dawn of the new boards as surfing became a professional sport. With surfing well and truly in the mainstream, and surfing producing professional athletes such as Mark Richards(MR), Tom Curren and Simon Anderson pushing boundaries and disqualifying the surfer from previous decades the 80's can mark The point of mainstream surfing. Mark Richard's neon 80's quiver. Although the notion of three fins had been toyed with for years, in 1981, Aussie surfer Simon Anderson popularised the  or three fin board. According to surf historian Nick Carroll in...

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History Of Surfing Innovation: Part 2: Tom Blake & George Freeth

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As surfing spread across the globe, reaching the USA in 1885 and Australia in the 1910’s, the history of surfing innovation took a major turn. Surfboards were beginning to change as the sport of surfing continued to grow. It has been widely quoted that the historical ‘king’ of surfing who brought on the surfing revival was Hawaiian Olympic swimmer and all-round water-dweller, Duke Kahanamoku.   The 'Sea God'himself, George Freeth       By the 20thcentury, the sport of surfing was a hot topic, with Europeans and Americans attempting the ‘strange’ new activity. At this time, Hawaiian GeorgeFreeth, who has been named the ‘Father of Modern Surfing’ came to public light. Following a surf lesson Freeth gave to renowned author Jack London, he was described as a "seagod . . .a brown Mercury. . . calm...

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